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to change washington solely from the inside. that is what the president has always believed, that we need the american people to keep pushing on washington and their leaders. you just cannot transfer this. people are not going to spend hours away from their families and their jobs contributing financially when it is are for them to do it unless they believe in the candidate. all of this, the door knocks, the contributions made, the phone calls made, or because these people believed in barack obama. for candidates who want to try and build a grass-roots campaign, it's not going to happen because there is a list are because you have the best technology. they have to build up the kind of emotional appeal so people are willing to go out there and spend their time and resources and provide their talents because they believe in someone and what they are offering. we are hopeful that many people that helped us this time will end up running for office themselves, are leading nonprofit, or playing enormously valuable roles in their community. again, i think the only reason all this happened on the
. ♪ host: good morning, welcome to "washington journal." the fbi investigation that led to the resignation of general david petraeus has expanded to general john allen. the impact of all this on the intelligence community and national security will be part of several hearings on capitol hill later this week. lawmakers return to washington today amid a shake-up of the president obama national security team, facing the looming issue of the so-called fiscal cliff. that is where we want to begin today this morning. president obama will meet later on with labor leaders who are insisting that the president not compromise on cuts to medicare and social security. what is your take on this? avoiding this -- avoiding the fiscal cliff? host: remember, you can send us a clear message, post your comments on facebook, or send us an e-mail, journal@c-span.org. courtesy of the newseum, washington, front page of that newspaper and many of the newspapers this morning, including "the washington post," liberal groups prepare for an entitlement fight. this is what zachary goldfarb rights. -- writes. host: ther
will be successful in guiding our nation. >> paul ryan will return to washington, not as the next vice-president. but he did win re-election to the congressional seat he has held since 1998. >> the g.o.p. will remain in control of the house of representatives, the democrats failing to gets close to the 218 seats needed for a majority. the house speaker john boehner, obviously very pleased to retain his leadership role. >> for two years, our house majority has been the primary line of defense for the american people against a government that spends too much, taxes too much, certainly borrows too much, when it's left unchecked. and in the face of a staggering national debt that threatens our children's future, our majority passed a budget that begins to solve the problems. now, while others chose inaction in the face of this threat, we offered solutions. and the american people want solutions. and tonight, they have responded by renewing our house republican majority. >> the republicans will now have 221 seats, the 164 for the democrats. one wonders whether the leader the democratic part
to washington? >> you asked if i would vote for john boehner so i don't know. i would vote for a republican speaker. let me mention since we're talking about the lack of bipartisan ship. congressman's budget which is an impressive budget it wasn't supported by his own party. so we need people that can come up with bipartisan solutions reach across the table. i'm in the center. he's so far to the left there is no coming home for him. he's not your father's democrat, he's not a john f. kennedy democrat. he's got his own agenda. >> where is the center you could shake hands with a democrat over the table? >> can i? >> yeah, which issue? >> there are plenty of issues. bringing the corporate tax rate down. i think it's a great idea that he came up with and prick supported -- president clinton supported that. >> i'm proud to have the support of president clinton who said the progressive version is the best and it was the budget that most invested in putting america back into the future business because it protects social security, medicare and makes america competitive internationally. so i think
to washington to begin the hard work of repairing frayed relationships with the other side after a bitter, sometimes petty campa n campaign. it was well after midnight when the president, vice president and their families hugged and waved to supporters from the stage at mccormick place after president obama declared victory. >> tonight, more than 200 years after a former colony won the right to determine its own destiny, the task of perfecting our union moves forward. >> this is a cbs news special report. >> reporter: in the end, the popular vote was close, reflecting a deeply divided nation. >> the president has about a million more votes. >> reporter: but the president won an out-sized victory in the electoral college, by nearly running the table in the nine battleground states. >> the state of iowa, cbs news projects, will go to president obama. barack obama will be the winner in virginia. cbs news is projecting that president obama has won the state of ohio. >> reporter: a hoarse, but clearly relieved president obama, said he had spoken to governor romney by phone and congratulated h
came together to take your country back. [applause] you gave washington a laser-like message to listen to the people. [applause] you have done an incredible job of getting this country turned back around to the country that our founders established, a country that came from the people and you have changed the country to your massive efforts. i compliment you for it, and it was really the way you did it. as i have said, my role in life is to be the grain of sand to the oyster. you irritates the oyster and out comes a pearl. i have been your grain of sand that you chose. it has been an honor to be your grain of sand in this process. we will continue to make pearls as necessary in the future. fair enough? [applause] the american people have spoken. they have chosen governor clinton. congratulations. >> boo! >> wait a minute. the only way we are going to make it work, if we all team up together. let's give governor clinton a big round of applause. but for get the election. forget the election. the hard work is in front of us. we must all work together to rebuild our great country. you, the
to the washington area arriving outside of washington. thursday on washington journal with both chambers returning to washington next week, we will speak with our guest about what lies ahead and scott wilson. washington journal is life every morning at 7:00 a.m. eastern. analysts and the former director participated in a bipartisan panel examining the next steps for the president and congress hosted by laszlo strategies. this is over an hour. >> who loo>> good morning. welcome. i am founder and president of this organization which is laszlo strategies. it does strategic communication but we're not partisan and i am very honored and delighted to have a terrific set of panels to offer the audience today. we have to audiences, a live audience here, we are in the rayburn office building in a hearing room of the foreign affairs committee. i would like to thank congressman berman for his service. it is an incredible thing to have to serve or be willing to serve. it is a painful process to go through negative campaigning. i think the american voters odette of gratitude to all who are willing to serve whe
was in a book meeting in washington d.c. and looked at what the president did last time and needs to do this time. >> it was clear from the beginning that there would beative resistance from the republicans he did. but at the same time, i think he could have done more with respect to setting the right tone and showing some leadership and these are two areas that he has to focus on in his second term . reaching out to the business community and listening. and reacting to what he's being told and successly as difficult as it sometimes is and almost all of you in the room who had experience working with congress, that's the nature of the system. >> steve: i hope the system changes a bit and we get some stuff done for the next two years. >> brian: that woman walked in front. >> steve: didn't she know we were watching. >> gretchen: what was a factor in the tuesday election or a side show. the man who advised gary johnson and third party candidates here next. >> steve: look at the pilot's plane. it crashes and caught on camera. you can watch it. don't distribute. ♪ ♪ than that though, the
with me here on this day after election day. special coverage continues with wolf blitzer in washington. hey, wolf. >>> brooke, thanks very much. happening now, the president of the united states is on his way back to washington right now for four more years in the white house. you're going to see his return to the white house during this program. also, republicans still control the house of representatives. will the president find anymore cooperation in his second term than during his first? and after passage of an historic ballot question, how soon will it be until people in colorado can light up a marijuana cigarette legally? i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> right now president obama's aboard air force one. he's heading east from chicago. he's already reaching out to congressional leaders trying to set the agenda for his second term in office. across the country today americans awoke to banner headlines from re-elected in the president's hometown "chicago tribune" to "obama wins in his adopted city" "the washington post." the "new york times" proclaimed it's obam
. >>> welcome back, everybody. you're watching our special coverage of the election live from washington, d.c. this morning. with less than 24 hours to go, the candidates are focusing on the biggest prizes. those elusive swing states. right now, cnn has pennsylvania lean obama but both campaigns are fighting for the key stone state. today president obama is deploying bill clinton there, for four campaign stops. just one day after mitt romney took the state in pennsylvania, the theme from "rocky." pat toomey is a republican senator from pennsylvania. he campaigned with both romney and paul ryan this weekend. he joins us this morning. nice to see you, sir. thanks for talking with us. >> good morning, thanks for having me. >> appreciate that. we've heard sort of mixed messages on the state of pennsylvania. so lay it out for me. listen to republicans, they say pennsylvania is definitely in play. if you talk to the democrats, david plouffe said it's a sign of desperation to talk about pennsylvania. let me play for you what he said and then we'll answer that on the other side. >> we have a great
. that's the attitude in washington that needs to change. now, virginia, after four years as president, you know me. you know me. so when you're trying to sort through this argument about change, part of what you have to ask yourself is, who do you trust? when you are talking about the economy and policy that is so critical to our future, you've got to ask yourself, who do you trust? you may not agree with every decision i have made -- michele does not agree with every decision i have made. there may be times when you are frustrated at the pace of change. i am frustrated sometimes with the pace of change. but you know i mean what i say and i say what i mean. you know what i believe, you know where i stand, what i said we would end the war in iraq, we ended it. what i said we would pass health care reform, we passed it. when i said we would repeal do not ask do not tell, we repeal that. you know i tell the truth. and most importantly, you know i will fight for you and your families every single day as hard as i know how. so let me tell you, i know what will change looks like because i f
on it. i think the washington post made some comment on this ad, and said it was not "pants on fire." there was accuracy in the advertisement. i think i am going to leave it at that. host: on the republican line, theresa is waiting. caller: good morning, and thank you. i am pleased to have the opportunity to speak some of the things i would like to say. i hope that with the ground game with the republicans and in ohio that the people who are telling the people there to do their own research before they pull the lever. let them talk to people who go to doctors and things of that nature. they do not go just once in a while. they go quite frequently. when a doctor says to you, instead of "have a nice day," "stay healthy, , because i might not be able to take care of you," that is important to a senior citizen. on education, people need to really dig and find out what the educational programs are all about. it is more money and more money. it is all for the unions. if there were things going on in the school that the parents could see, instead of being pushed aside because the governmen
a cushion going into the counties around washington. >> and the more suburban -- obama will get a big a big scor. >> we haven't seen the vote tallies in virginia. and joining us on set is the arcitect -- >> call me "winner" house races? your job was to protect the majority or grow this. is it possible the republicans may net seats? >> we will get them in non- traditional areas. we will get them because we fought hard. this means you get to do a lot of things you wouldn't normally do. one goal of mine, four years ago, was to make sure we were a national party with a national message, to sell thit that way. john boehner backed it up and eric cantor with a great job. >> early numbers from ohio and virginia, you may be one of the few happy republicans in tonigh. >> how do you feel about the washington. >> we put a lot of work into this. the rcc is about winning. cantor and boehner were with us -- winning back twice. you have to prove you can do it. >> for those watching, the congressman runs the campaign committee. controls the money that is spent -- what is one district you will win tonight th
in washington that we've enjoyed so much over the past two years. >> that actually is the question before we get to our panel. we have a lot of the same still to come. what will be different and what is the lesson learned from this? >> well, it's status quo. you've got the president sitting in charge of the executive branch, obviously, president obama. the house remains in republicans' control. and the senate -- i think, you know, big pickup for the depths in the senate. all of these key races that were supposed to be so close got blown out. that's really where the soul searching's going to take place. because as i said i've said repeatedly for four years, when you run in the house, you can beat something with nothing. and i'm living proof of that. i did it in 1994. >> he undercuts himself. >> but when you run in the senate and the electorate expands, you've got to be a bit more toward the middle. and when you run for the white house, you'd better have a governing philosophy that will pull bucks county in pennsylvania, that will pull the i-4 corridor and that will pull these swing states. i'll t
. >> caller: thank you. the people are so tired of the fighting in washington. like the one candidate said, if they don't do their job they do not get paid. we, the people come have got to start taking these matters into hands because we are sick of it. and, you know, what i would like to tell john boehner is don't give in to this craziness. this is nothing but craziness. and i watched harry reid yesterday. you know, he talked and he talked and he really said nothing. then he went on about dance, dance, dance and i thought to myself all you do is dance around with these bills that they send. the house will have a bill, they send it to the senate and what does he do? dances around it and never addresses it. >> host: know by partisanship than for you? >> caller: no, absolutely none. then when he left the stage and was walking off, the man -- i feel bad for him that he just can't get it together -- he grabbed ahold of the flag. he was falling. then he grabbed ahold of low wall and at that point i said uh oh that man needs to go home. he's too old to be there. he doesn't do his job and is coll
. >> janet. george washington university school of public health. there was a lot of discussion on women's issues. i am wondering if you can speak to the role of gender in the governing. we are seeing more candidates who are successful in their elections and one state's -- is entirely female. >> kelly ayote. when you have that kind of coalition and the democratic party and that remarkable picture of the congressional committee of all republican and not white men talking about contraception or ever was before the committee at the time, that is an image of perjury is exactly why republicans are having a hard time in connecting with female voters in that gender gap. >> romney did significantly improve among white women. not only did not college white women, but also the college white women. this is the first time the democrats have lost them since 1988. >> there is also of the marriage gap. if you are a married woman, you vote different in different ways. that is another thing the republican party is facing. there is new to an era where you bought your identity rather than your interest. >>
shift. i remember when i came to washington in the 1980s, people were writing an article, i wrote an article for -- i wrote an article for -- remember that carline bowman -- was that public opinion? >> yeah, yeah. >> on the block, the electoral law, that there was a republican electoral law. i think you'll probably start to see people talk about a democratic electoral lock due to these changing demographics. so the hispanic numbers picked up, and we are seeing an electric whether democrats democrats are doing well among african-americans, hispanics, asians, younger voters and white liberals. and that, that needle appears to have moved slightly to the democrats so that if you have a kind of normal base election, the democrats have a very slight advantage. i think most people will say we will continue to grow over time, unless the republicans do something to make inroads among what now are becoming some poor democratic constituencies, at least some. but if you look at the house races, you have to be cautious about the big message you are drawing. if the democrats again what looks to
it. >> get over what? what are you talking about? >> all of you are in here. in washington, msnbc and "time" magazine senior political analyst, mark halperin. >> richard's in here? >> i don't know why. i'm serious. what's going on? also, look at this cast we have today, the author of "thomas jefferson, the art of power," historian jon meacham. is meacham here? meacham, look at him. >> lots of books. >> and willie, congratulations on your newest honor. >> thank you. are you in nashville, jon meacham? >> i'm in washington. going to be in nashville tomorrow. >> he needs a pipe in that setting. >> yes, he should, and a fireplace. >> you're saying donny's milking this thing. >> we talked about it for ten minutes. we got on the set and donny's, like, can we do this again today? >> unfortunately, joe and i are on what's called the decaying page. guys falling apart. we're on the presidential page. >> you look good. >> right next to brad pitt. >> that kind of ruins it. okay. well, there you go. >> okay, take that down, please. >> oh! >> there we go. >> it's too early for this. >> it is. ta
.m. and then 1:00 a.m., we'll have california, hawaii, idaho, oregon, washington, and then the last poll closing in alaska. unless this is a very strange night, those races will be interesting for governors races and senate and house races and state issues, but not necessarily for the presidency. unless things go very, very differently than expected to go. this is how your election viewing is going to unfold hour by hour on tuesday night. if you just exclude the states for the presidential race where everybody pretty much knows exactly how it's going to go and just the states where there is some question as to what's going to happen, here is a clip and save thing for you about these states. the battlegrounds. all right? states that you know are going to be important and everybody thinks they're going to be close. these are the states everybody is going to be watching on tuesday night. each of these states, as you know, has a top elections official. and each of these states has a top elections official who is a partisan. who is either a democrat or a republican. and in a democracy, that should me
out of. for example, we think that folks in washington, especially men, should not try to control health care choices that women are perfectly capable of making themselves. >> now, madison, we had a president that shared these beliefs. his name was bill clinton. when he first came into office, his economic plan asked the wealthiest americans to pay a little bit more so we could reduce our deficit and still invest in the skills and ideas of our people, and at the time the republican congress and a certain senate candidate by the name of mitt romney said bill clinton's plan would hurt the economy, would kill jobs, would hurt the job creators. does this sound familiar? turns out his math back then was just as bad as it is now. because by the end of president clinton's second term, america created 23 million new jobs. incomes were up. port was down. our deficit had turned into a surplus. so, wisconsin, our ideas have been tested. we've tried them. they worked. the other side's ideas have also been tested. they didn't work so well. after bill clinton left office during most of the last
in the evening-- this is in the collar area around the distric districf columbia around washington-- are they get anything sense from parts of virginia or any recalling state? >> warner: well, not that they're telling me, gwen. which doesn't mean they aren't, because they had this whole system set up with people at these key precincts with smart phonessably to report both who voted literally, who voted by name, who hadn't yet voted. and staying there to report preliminary returns or returns. so, you know, it may be coming into the war room, which is by the way not here at the convention center but down at what used to be called the boston garden. it's now called the t.d. garden. i have not been able to find out what they're hearing. they did have high hopes fairly early in the evening those counties in northern virginia they would have a clear sense of romney doing expwl, therefore, a very good omen for the evening. >> ifill: i'll really curious about one thing today, mitt romney spent part of his day in two cities in which he is not expected to do well, cleveland and pittsburgh, two industrial c
, thank you for coming in. roll call house editor. that is it for "washington journal." nancy pelosi is giving a press conference in a few moments on c-span 2. we will now join the house which is in session. day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of january 17, 2012, the chair will now recognize members from lists submitted by the majority and minority leaders for morning hour debate . the chair will alternate recognition between the parties with each party limited to one hour and each member other than the majority and minority leaders and the minority whip limited to five minutes but in no event shall debate continue beyond 11: 50 a.m. the chair recognizes the gentleman from illinois, mr. quigley, for five minutes. mr. quigley: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, an estimated 50,000 people die every year as a result of seize years. some of -- seizures. some of these victims are like danny stanton. chicago's mike and mary stanton founded the danny foundation after their 4-year-old son, danny
around louunn coty. the average income is $115,000. very close to washington d.c. in the southwest in dickinson county $29,000. >> it's a tremendous disparity. so much of those jobs in that urban crescent are defense-related. that's been a particular issue in this campaign. as this state looks to what may happen after the election with regard to see questions traition of those automatic and indiscriminate cuts that will take place in january 2 if the spending plan is not developed. so there's a lot of attention, a lot of focus on what may happen after see questions traition. that will be deeply interesting to those people who are making that kind of money because so much of that is oriented around the defense industry. >> sreenivasan: kathy lewis, thanks so much for your time. >> thank you. ifill: now let's go to 30,000 feet on this evening from presidential historians and newshour regulars michael beschloss and richard norton smith. you know, michael, i have heard time and time again throughout this campaign that this has been a campaign about small things. the big picture was mis
in bellingham, washington, good afternoon. please go ahead with your question or comment for steven johnson. >> caller: hi, pleasure speaking to you. 8, i was a first wave environmental planner back in the mid '70s, so i'dhead of your ghost -- i'd heard of your ghost maps story. and in -- after i graduated i thought i'd kick around the idea of architecture plus ecology and play with computer models and satellite data late at night without authorization. [laughter] before the term hacker or geospatial intelligence technology was invented. anyway, i became a mr. mom in '82 because that was really going nowhere. today, however, it looks like, you know, cloud technology and c factor computing and a lot of these breakthroughs are going to make three dimensional environmental computing feasible. the problem i saw then was a global vision in a flat world, you know? we didn't really have a three dimensional philosophy. to work with this new technology. and i don't even see it there now. and it's kind of a little troubling, you know? any comments, thoughts? thanks. >> guest: yeah, great. what an int
in the senate, which is contrary to what anybody in washington, i think, thought, even as late as labor day. we know the house is going to stay roughly the same. absent breaking news, i bring you no precinct returns from florida. i'd like to spend more time on why this is happened, and what that means for us going forward. first, i share the admiration all around for president obama's campaign team. they were tech nickically close to perfect in the first responsibility of a campaign team, that is to identify and turn out voters. they planned it. they executed it. every step of the way, they knew what votes they needed, got out and got them. they began weeks before election day banking favorable votes in states where they had already had people on the ground preplabbed to produce. again, technically, a superb operation, one to set the standard for future campaigns and now you identify your voters, encourage them to turn out, and perhaps some people think by the fourth or fifth visit or phone call verging on harassment to turn themçó out, t it worked. the point i want to make beyond that, howev
and republicans hold the house, washington on the morning after is going to look very much like washington the day before. >> of course, nicolle wallace who worked in the pal in/mccain campaign four years ago, george w. bush, the huge issue, overwhelming issue, the economy. that is the issue that mitt romney wanted to make his calling card. >> that's right. they are looking at the same information we're looking at as people are still voting, you know, they're hoping that's what they had in mind when they went to the polls day. they made a sales pitch that was 100% about voters being dissatisfied with the pace of recovery. that was the beginning, middle and end of mitt romney's pitch to the american people and they're on the same pins and needles we are to see if it worked. >> donna brazile, one thing we saw, the exitle pos and a surprise to me in the exit polls if we can pull it up now, we asked about the direction of the country and one thing that it showed, donna brazile, who worked for campaign manager for al gore back in 2000, a dramatic reduction over the last year in people who think the cou
. in the suburbs of washington. fairfax county and next door in prince william county. in 2008 in the counties president obama did well against mccain. 61% to 389%. in fairfax. prince william, louden, 54-vi. the president will need to do well there. he has to do well there to run up the vote total and make up for romney strength in south and west of virginia. watching virginia very closely when the polls close. >> well done. >> a state that is critical is virginia. i went for president obama in 2008, but romney needs it. mike emanuel live in richmond. good evening. >> election officials describe turn-out as robust and ahead of 2008 levels. experts predicting the record turn-out in the range of 4 million voters. with long lines across virginia that could be achieved. republican vice presidential nominee paul ryan made one final visit to virginia. the richmond area this afternoon. just hours before the polls close at 7:00 p.m. ryan told campaign staff and volunteers this is are a great effort. they should keep it up. wake up tomorrow morning knowing they did evening they could in virginia. for r
washington, next "fox news sunday." ecision day. >> special coverage starts right now on america's election ahead quarters. good evening and welcome to a special edition of america's election headquarters, i'm bret baier. >> i'm megyn kelly, we are less than 48 hours away from the first poll closings that will determine who the next president of the united states will be. the two candidates are crisscrossing the nation hoping to lock in support in key states and this race could not get any tighter. the real clear politics average, that's an average of 11 national polls, has president obama leading by just 1/2 a point over governor romney. over the next hour we will have analysis from chris wallace and brit hume, both have covered elections for decades. >> well, we will also check in with charles krauthammer on the trajectory of the race in the final days, but we begin with fox team coverage. steve brown is in the key swing state of o-o as is chief white house correspondent ed henry travelling with the president on his four states tour and chief political correspondent carl camero
of washington, d.c. and even in florida outside of tampa, they're seeing big turnout numbers there, too. they don't think he can get his 2008 turnout numbers but, scott, as you know tonight, it's going to be all about turnout. >> pelley: yes, it will, jan, thank you very much. the candidate who gets his voters to the polls is likely to win today. norah, turnout is everything and the electorate's been changing since 2008. >> it has. that's one of the things i'm going to be looking at tonight. not only how big is the turnout but the size of the electorate. the different democrat graphic groups. we saw as i pointed out during our evening news that 26% of the electorate in 2008 was a minority electorate. does that grow? does it stay the same or shrink? that will be part of it. the white vote which was about 73% of the vote where will that be tonight? it will speak to not only the changing nature of the country's electorate but also give us clues about which candidate is doing better. >> pelley: bob, the national polls over the last few days, dead heat. dead even for both candidates. it's re
been a storm in washington for the past four years. people couldn't see it, just by turning on the tv, but they hear about it. we have a continuing financial crisis in this country, and the republican obstructionists, well, they refuse to help. president obama came into office with a crisis on the scale of this current natural disaster. it required a heavy lift. from all players to get america back on track. republicans, where were they? well, they were not willing participants. journalist michael grunwald wrote, "vice president joe biden was warned not to expect any bipartisan cooperation on major votes. biden said, i spoke to seven different republican senators who said, joe, i'm not going to be able to help you on anything." his informants said senate minority leader mitch mcconnell had demanded unified resistance. the way it was characterized to me was for the next two years we can't let you succeed in anything. that's our ticket to coming back. what if we took that attitude right there to the storm damage and cleanup? now mitt romney said he's the guy who can reach across the ais
around washington. on the other hand, the big strength for governor romney is down in coal country, down in southeastern virginia. then governor romney probably has a better chance around norfolk because of those defense issues down there that you just heard john dickerson talk about. so when we get a better feel as to where most of this vote is turning how the, we'll have a better feel as to whose actually ahead. >> pelley: nora, this gives canada them alot of confidence. >> virginia is key. they feel good about virginia because of that heavy turnout. those exit polls we talked about 52% of the electorate is female. it was actually 54% in 2008. these numbers can change a little bit but suggest the female vote is down a little bit. and one of the toughest fights we saw over women voters was actually in virginia. the after that debate where there was that discussion about binders full of women, romney immediately went on the air in virginia with an ad saying that he is for contraception and then obama came back with another ad contradicting that sniesmght thank yo.>> pelley: thank you .
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 70 (some duplicates have been removed)